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Positive implications from socially accountable, community engaged medical education across two Philippines regions.

This study describes differences between the practice locations of Philippines medical graduates from two ‘socially accountable, community-engaged’ health professional education (SAHPE) schools and the practice locations of graduates from two ‘conventionally trained’ medical schools located in the same respective geographic regions.
 The Friends of Mosvold Scholarship Scheme in northern KwaZulu-Natal is a locally based scholarship scheme that offers the local community a chance to develop its own human resources for health care. This concept is being extended to the Limpopo and North-West provinces through the Wits Initiative for Rural Health Education. The scheme provides a model for human resource development at a district level that could be usefully adopted by any tier of government.
Access to the physician training program was broadened by admitting students who obtained at least Grade C (60%) in mathematics and physical science at standard grade, and who demonstrated appropriate personal attributes. An innovative curriculum, combining problem-based learning with community-based education (PBL/CBE) in small tutorial group settings, was also adopted. This approach was aimed at educating and graduating a broader cohort of students, while training future doctors to identify, analyze, and treat health problems in the rural South African context.
The aim of this paper was to describe the impact of socially-accountable health professional education on graduates; specifically: their motivation towards community-based service, preparation for addressing local priority health issues, career choices, and practice location
The programme titled “Collaborative Project to Increase Production of Rural Doctors” (CPIRD) is a rural medical education project launched in 1994 in Thailand. This study aimed to compare the academic performances in medical study over five years and the pass rates in national medical license examinations (MLE) between students enrolled in CPIRD and two other tracks.
The objective of this review is to identify and examine different remuneration models of Community Health Workers (CHWs) that have been utilized in large-scale sustained programmes to gain insight into the effect that remuneration has on the motivation and focus of CHWs. 

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