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The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of community health worker (CHW) training on recognition and satisfaction regarding the performance of CHWs among members of the community in Amazonas, Brazil, which is a resource-poor area underserved with regard to medical health care accessibility.
A shadow hangs over the struggle to understand the COVID-19 pandemic’s different problems – a shadow of necropolitics that puts some people and risks in the obscure background, while others are highlighted, in the foreground. Social activists and primary care professionals are working hard to help people stay safe and providing basic necessities like food, water or soap. Meanwhile, far-right protesters, some from the better-off classes who protest from the safety of their cars, but also daily workers, Uber drivers and street traders are out against the lockdown, in protests described as nearing a military coup. They want workers to get back to work, contrary to public health recommendations. The elites want the economy to be re-opened, so they can go back to profiting, while the precariously-employed are torn between the need to stay safe and the need to return to work in the absence of alternative means of survival. The question of survival marks the ‘edges’ of the pandemic. ‘Edges’ or borders (Bhattarcharya 2018) are where rights and freedoms are differentiated for different groups of people. Bordering is not only about the control of migration, or about the differences between the ‘global north’ and the ‘global south’. Bordering takes place within states, within public institutions and even within the public sphere. Brazil is rapidly becoming a front-runner in the horrible reversal of the ideal of justice playing out across the world – the last are coming first in experiencing the brunt of mass ill-being, fear, insecurity, and death. Necropolitical assumptions run through current ‘scientific’ models and conceptions of society, especially those that model society as synonymous with ‘economy’. The aggregated statistics of pandemic monitoring offer an impersonal universalizing language of a single ‘population’ or ‘economy’. Science, law and ethics are complicit when they universalize in ways that disguise
The indigenous peoples of Brazil have long suffered from deforestation, forest fires, poisoned rivers and invasion of their lands. Now they are in danger of being wiped out by Covid-19, unless urgent measures are taken to protect them. Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado, who has worked in the Amazon for the past decade, and Lélia Wanick Salgado, who designs her books and exhibitions, are calling for immediate action to protect this fragile population from the risk of coronavirus carried by invaders from their lands. The appeal below is addressed to the three branches of the Brazilian State. Sebastião and Lélia ask you to sign and share.

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