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The aim of this paper was to describe the impact of socially-accountable health professional education on graduates; specifically: their motivation towards community-based service, preparation for addressing local priority health issues, career choices, and practice location
Access to the physician training program was broadened by admitting students who obtained at least Grade C (60%) in mathematics and physical science at standard grade, and who demonstrated appropriate personal attributes. An innovative curriculum, combining problem-based learning with community-based education (PBL/CBE) in small tutorial group settings, was also adopted. This approach was aimed at educating and graduating a broader cohort of students, while training future doctors to identify, analyze, and treat health problems in the rural South African context.
To enhance the clinical experience, the UoN Medical Education Partnership Initiative Program undertook to train medical students in non-tertiary hospitals around the country under the mentorship of consultant preceptors at these hospitals. This study focused on the evaluation of the pilot decentralised training rotation.
Studies demonstrate that the CME/CPD (continuing medical education/continuing professional development) needs of rural general practitioners (GPs) are unique. Little research has focused specifically on the effectiveness of CME/CPD programmes for rural practice. The aim of this paper was to review the literature on CME/CPD for GPs in rural areas, focussing on studies which examined impact on doctor performance or patient outcomes.
The objectives of this study were to: (1) characterize the population of currently practicing GPs in Iquitos and Requena in terms of demographics, current medical practice, and educational goals; (2) determine the obstacles faced by general physicians in Loreto, Peru in pursuing residency training; (3) provide baseline information to be used by medical academic institutions to develop specialization programs in Loreto.
Indigenous sub-Saharan societies have, over the millennia, lived and socialised within the unwritten ‘rules’ of the ‘Ubuntu’ or similar philosophies that emphasises holistic ‘humanness’, and which is a form of ‘social responsibility’. This article looks into some relevant social responsibility aspects of medical education in the South African context, with particular emphasis on how these aspects have been addressed. 

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