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The NABH Digital Health Standards aims to consider all relevant aspects of the application of patient interfacing technologies across the continuum of care applicable for outpatient, inpatient, and remote patient monitoring. Digital technologies in Indian healthcare are certainly witnessing huge adoption due to the lockdown imposed to reduce the spread of the coronavirus disease Covid-19. A major step towards ensuring the quality of healthcare and patient safety has been taken by the National Accreditation Board for Hospitals and Healthcare Providers (NABH) which has initiated the work on standards for digital health.
Despite the unequivocal assurances provided by the Deputy Chief Medical Officer and the federal Education Minister, much about COVID-19 remains a mystery. There’s still a lot we don’t know about how the virus affects children. That means the stakes are high when deciding whether kids go back to school now, either full or part-time, or remain at home for now and return at the start of Term 3. Children can get COVID-19, but we don’t know whether they are less likely to become infected. One thing we do know is that children of all ages can get COVID-19. There have been 271 confirmed cases of children with COVID-19 in Australia so far.4 Some studies, discussed below, suggested they were less likely to catch the virus than adults, but good recent evidence suggests children may be just as vulnerable.
Interprofessional collaboration is considered an important strategy in overcoming the complex issues associated with healthcare outcomes. A nationwide, community-based integrated care system developed for the care of older people in individual communities in Japan requires community hospitals to deliver integrated care to coordinate efforts for creating effective environments for health. This study aimed to explore the factors associated with the self-assessment score of interprofessional collaboration in community hospitals.
Question: What was the initial experience in Singapore with the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)? Findings: In this descriptive case series of the first 18 patients diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection in Singapore between January 23 and February 3, 2020, clinical presentation was a respiratory tract infection with prolonged viral shedding from the nasopharynx of 7 days or longer in 15 patients (83%). Supplemental oxygen was required in 6 patients (33%), 5 of whom were treated with lopinavir-ritonavir, with variable clinical outcomes following treatment. Meaning: These findings provide clinical features and course among patients diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection in Singapore.
Doctors have expressed concern over new guidance from Public Health England that recommends reusing personal protective equipment in the face of shortages.1 The guidance, which also recommends alternatives for unavailable equipment, has been seen as an admission by the government of the PPE shortages facing healthcare staff. Rob Harwood, chair of the BMA’s Consultants Committee, said, “This guidance is a further admission of the dire situation that some doctors and healthcare workers continue to find themselves in because of government failings.

May 7, 2020 Archive

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