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COVID-19 is striking Arizona’s rural areas harder than urban ones, exacting a disproportionate toll on communities thin on medical care and basic infrastructure, an analysis of Arizona’s positive cases and deaths shows. Nowhere is that more evident than on the Navajo Nation, which on Thursday confirmed it had 405 cases in Arizona, out of 558 across the entire reservation, which spans portions of Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico. That means that the Nation is home to 1.4 percent of Arizona’s population but now has slightly more than 13 percent of the state’s current COVID-19 cases.
After four months of fear, death and destruction of the global economy, there is at least feeling of some respite, just respite. Many countries where the Coronavirus attack impact is most, showed some signs of slow down. Worldwide infections are over 30 lakhs deaths of over 210,000 as on 28th April. This figure will go up as days pass by. More than the health and panic, globally close to billion people have lost their livelihood, income and some of them are pushed back into poverty and desperation. Millions of people have stuck outside their home while the rest of the global population stuck in their homes. Nothing ever happened, hopefully, will never occur in future. India, with a population of 1.3 billion reported less than 30,000 infections and close to 1000 deaths. The virus is kind to India, so far. The Only hope is the history of 1918 should not repeat both globally and in India.
The COVID-19 Health Literacy Project provides translations of essential information about COVID-19 in more than 35 languages. Harvard faculty has vetted all of the information in this project that was started by a medical student at Harvard. Patients with limited English proficiency are likely to be at higher risk for COVID-19 and its complications. These translational materials, along with a guidance article, Culturally and Linguistically Competent Care from ECRI, can help provide health centers with the information needed to communicate with those patients whose first language is not English and other patients with diverse cultural needs.
Countries around the world must be prepared for a “second or third wave” of the coronavirus until a vaccine is available, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has warned. Europe remains “very much in the grip” of the pandemic, despite positive signs it was passing the peak, said Dr Hans Kluge, the head of the WHO in Europe. “Covid-19 is not going away any time soon,” he added. It comes after the University of Oxford announced it was partnering with pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca for the development, manufacture and large-scale distribution of the Covid-19 vaccine candidate currently being trialled in the UK.
Financial damage caused by the COVID-19 pandemic could cause up to 100 hospitals to close within a year, according to an analysis by USA Today. The analysis revealed thousands of hospitals across the U.S. were strapped for cash before the pandemic. Only about half of the 5,000 hospitals that reported cash-on-hand figures in 2017 had enough money to cover one month of salaries, according to USA Today’s analysis of financial reports submitted to CMS. For many hospitals that were under financial stress before COVID-19 arrived in the U.S., the dramatic drop in revenue due to canceling nonemergency care and increased supplies costs could cause them to close. Of the more than 2,700 counties with confirmed cases of COVID-19, nearly half are served by a hospital that recorded negative net income in 2017, according to USA Today’s analysis.

April 5, 2020 Archive

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